Keeping Up With Atiba: SEALS 2017 Tropical Storm Edition

First of all—I’m happy to be back on the blog and sharing my work. I’ve taken time away from sabbatical, and over the next few weeks I’ll be sharing big events and projects coming up. But I wanted to kick off this post-sabbatical post by sharing what I’m up to at the Southeastern Association of Law Schools 2017 Annual Conference (SEALS).

So, I’m writing this from 30,000 feet as I look out of the window over the Florida coastline. I can see ocean, beach, and clouds, and my first reaction is—sun, shore, and scholarship—three of my favorite things.

My second thought: I’m flying into a tropical storm!

The delays caused by the storm have been minor, the storm should cross over today and move out tomorrow, so I’m hoping it will not dampen what promises to be an exciting conference. (And frankly, after attending these for years, I thought it only a matter of time before hurricane season caught up with a conference usually held in Florida in August!)

I wanted to highlight specifically the discussion groups and panels I’ll be involved in—if you can make it through the rain, stop by and dry off.

My SEALS Conference Schedule, In Brief

Monday, July 31

  • 3:00 PM: Beyond the Socratic Method in Trusts and Estates

Thursday, August 3

  • 9:00 AM: Reforming the Presidential Selection Process
  • 1:00 PM: Inside the Mind of the Outside Reviewer

Saturday, August 5

  • Book Projects and Publication in Election Law

SEALS: The Details

Today – Monday, July 31 – at 3:00 PM, I will be participating in a discussion group on teaching innovation in Trusts & Estates Law. In particular, I hope to discuss my work regarding how I have used social media and outside-the-box teaching materials to enliven my intro Trusts & Estates class. Here’s the abstract:

WORKSHOP ON TRUSTS AND ESTATES
Discussion Group: Beyond the Socratic Method in Trusts and Estates

Many trusts and estates courses have historically focused their teaching techniques on the traditional Socratic method, and much of trusts and estates scholarship has focused on the development of doctrine within the field itself. This discussion group will explore pedagogy that is expanding the ways of teaching and studying trusts and estates and related doctrines. The discussion group will address: 1) innovations in teaching, including both skills and doctrine; and 2) incorporating concepts from Elder Law, Family Law, Property, and Professional Responsibility into Trusts and Estates — and vice versa.

I will be presenting at two events on Thursday, August 3:

First, at 9:00 AM, I will be discussing my proposal for a National Primary Day (to unify all primaries on one day) as a means to improve the presidential nomination and selection process. This is part of the Constitutional Law Workshop sponsored by SEALS:

WORKSHOP ON CONSTITUTIONAL LAW
Discussion Group: Reforming the Presidential Nomination Process

This panel discusses the nature of the presidential nomination process and how it might be changed, improved, or reformed. Presidential candidates are winnowed though party primaries, and this winnowing process is controlled by the two major political parties, receiving little influence from ordinary voters and citizens. The timing of our presidential primaries, how our party primaries are conducted, how party convention delegates are chosen, and how the votes of delegates are counted are all issues that parties decide on their own. This panel examines the presidential nomination process, how it unfolds, the role that political parties play in it, and how American citizens might have more of an influence over it going forward.

Second, at 1:00 PM, I will be discussing the Promotion and Tenure process on a panel entitled “Inside the Mind of the Outside Reviewer.” The goal of our workshop is to give attendees a perspective on the process of and importance of the external review process to the overall process of gaining tenure and promotion. Read more in the abstract:

NEW SCHOLARS WORKSHOP
Inside the Mind of the Outside Reviewer

In the promotion and tenure process, mentors stress to junior faculty the need to create a scholarly agenda, to find an original niche in their field, and to place their work well. However, what is not often discussed is one very important data point in the tenure decision, the external reviewer. This panel will discuss the role of the external reviewer in the tenure process, the expectations that external reviewers have, and the strategies that pre-tenure faculty can implement early on to succeed in this critical part of the tenure evaluation process.

Saturday, August 5 at 1:00 PM, I’ll be moderating a discussion group on current book projects in the Election Law field. (I will be presenting my book proposal on voter fraud ideology and American democracy).

DISCUSSION GROUP
Book Projects and Publication in Election Law
As the recent election cycle has shown, issues surrounding election law remain germane to the public concerning the American political process. Election law, as a field, has continued to address these issues through not only scholarship and public intellectual engagement, but also through historical and contemporary book-length works that have examined key cases and issues in the field. This discussion group explores the development of this branch of book-length election law scholarship and provide an opportunity for election law scholars currently working on book-length projects to discuss their current work.

And in the coming days and weeks, I’ll write more about my book and other ongoing projects (including my Boden Visiting Professorship at Marquette University and [new addition] my upcoming TEDx talk this November. Stay tuned!

Keeping Up With Atiba: MAPOC Edition

I am presenting today and tomorrow at the twenty-second Mid-Atlantic People of Color Legal Scholarship Conference. It is being held at the George Washington University Law School in Washington, DC, and the theme of the conference is “Legal and Political Change During the Obama Era.”

Today at 2:00 PM, I commented on a work-in-progress by Professor Khaled Beyhoun of the University of Detroit-Mercy School of Law. His work is entitled “Acting Muslim.”  Professor Beyhoun already has a tremendous national and international profile as an expert commentator on Islamophobia, critical theory, and religious freedom. His work in progress promises to be a substantial contribution to the literature on the intersectional nature of racialized religious discrimination, and an important intellectual and litigation tool in the post-Obama era.

Trump tweet on investigating voter fraud

Tomorrow at 3:15 PM, I will be speaking on the fourth and final plenary panel of the conference, “Election 2016: Revelation sand Responses.” I will address what has become an extremely timely topic, “Voter Fraud as Nemesis: Fragility, Distortion, and the 2016 Election.” In this talk, I will discuss the President’s ongoing propaganda campaign asserting the existence of voter fraud by “illegal” voters (notwithstanding any evidence to support his claims) and its interrelationship with the identity politics of post-racialism. This, read through the larger dynamic of voter suppression illustrated by recent voter identification cases like NAACP v. McCrory and Veasey v. Abbott, illustrates a new era of racialized and class-focused political domination. Like others who have commented on Trump’s motives and the endgame of these voter fraud claims, e.g., Professor Erika Wilson’s commentary in yesterday’s Washington Post, I will draw out how this narrative serves to enable voter suppression.  However, unlike other recent commentators, I will frame this discussion through the lens of meme theory (an approach I developed in my paper, The Meme of Voter Fraud), to further develop an account of the intersectional nature of this deployment of the voter fraud meme in the post-Shelby County era of voting rights recalibration.

Keeping Up With Atiba: New Years Edition

Happy New Year, and welcome to the first Keeping Up With Atiba installment of 2017! This month I am presenting at two conferences, and I hope you will be able to join me.

Association of American Law Schools (AALS)

This weekend I will be moderating the Minority Groups section’s panel, “Presidential Politics and the Future of the Supreme Court: Post-Election Reflections and Forecasts for the ‘Post-Racial’ Post-Obama White House” (Co-Sponsored by Constitutional Law & Election Law). This promises to be a lively and important discussion. aals-meeting-2017

Description
The 2016 presidential campaign has been characterized as one of the most contentious and surprising in history. This program explores how the landscape of presidential politics has uncovered deep divides among the American population. According to some, the gender, class, and racial representation of the presidential candidates added multidimensional complexity to the task of deciphering the contemporary effects of this divisiveness. The long battle to the White House has ignited heated national conversations on race, immigration, and counterterrorism policy, as well as debates on gun, voting, and reproductive rights. Moreover, Justice Scalia’s death at the height of the campaign season opened the door to an examination of the role of campaign and identity politics in the Supreme Court nomination process. Distinguished experts on race and the law, election law, national security, constitutional law, and immigration, among other areas, offer their reflections on the 2016 presidential election and the new administration, particularly Supreme Court nomination process and what we might expect (or hope for) under the new administration.

Location
Saturday, January 7, 10:30 am – 12:15 pm
Hilton San Francisco Union Square
Continental Ballroom 6, Ballroom Level, Hilton

Speakers
Jennifer M. Chacon, University of California, Irvine School of Law
Guy-Uriel E. Charles, Duke University School of Law
Bertrall Ross, University of California, Berkeley School of Law
Shirin Sinnar, Stanford Law School
Franita Tolson, Florida State University College of Law

Celebrating the Life and Legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. 

For the second year in a row, I will participate in Washington and Lee University’s Martin Luther King, Jr. Day events. I will be part of a panel on voting rights entitled “The 2016 Presidential Election: Voting Rights in a ‘Post-Racial’/’Post-Civil Rights’ Era.”

Location
Monday, January 16, 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
Millhiser Moot Courtroom, Washington and Lee University School of Law

Speakers
Chris Seaman (Moderator), Associate Professor of Law, Washington and Lee University School of Law
Atiba Ellis, Professor of Law, West Virginia University College of Law
Luis Fuentes-Rohwer, Professor of Law and Harry T. Ice Faculty Fellow, Indiana University Maurer School of Law
Mark Rush, Director of International Education and Waxberg Professor of Politics and Law, Washington and Lee University School of Law

Mid-Atlantic People of Color Legal Scholarship Conference (MAPOC)

Later this month I will participate in this year’s MAPOC conference “Legal and Political Change During the Obama Era.” I will speak as part of the panel “Election 2016: Revelations and Responses” where I am looking MAPOC Convention graphic of Obamaforward to reflecting on the open, online class discussion I held at West Virginia University the day
after the the presidential
election.

Location
Saturday, January 28, 3:00 pm to 4:30 pm
The George Washington University Law School, Washington DC

Election Law Open Class November 9, 2016: Post-Election Discussion

The following video is from my Election Law and Policy class meeting on November 9, 2016. I opened the class to an extended question and answer session to address the aftermath of the presidential election. It was open to the community at the West Virginia University College of Law and to my social media networks. To date, it has received nearly 1,000 views.

The discussion covered topics including the pros and cons of the Electoral College, the challenges the political system continues to face after this election, and the possibilities and limits of the rule of law in the Trump era. Probably the highlight of this discussion is the discussion between two of my students – a white male and a African American female – about her feelings of racial threat in this “era of Trump” and his view that the rule of law will be sufficient to protect her and other minorities.

The discussion is provocative, informative, and a useful tool for reflecting on the election.  And to the extent you found this discussion useful, please let me know, and let me know whether you’d like more live chats and/or podcasts facilitated by me to have more conversations in this new political era.

The Link to the National Constitution Center Debate on Voter Identification Laws

I want to thank the Center, the Federalist Society, the American Constitution Society, and all those involved in putting this event together. I have some thoughts about the substance of this debate that I will share soon, so stay tuned for further follow ups from the debate. You can watch the debate below or directly on YouTube.